District Court

Technology in courts


Videoconferencing

Many New South Wales courtrooms have videoconferencing facilities, which are linked into a network that operates across justice agencies in NSW. These are often referred to as Audio Visual Links (AVL).

The videoconferencing network is primarily used for bail hearings and interviews between legal practitioners and their clients, while they are in custody.

The network consists of around 250 videoconferencing sites in courtrooms, correctional centres, juvenile justice detention centres, legal aid offices, police stations, public defenders offices and offices of the Director of Public Prosecutions and Community Relations Commission.


Using videoconferencing in civil proceedings

External videoconferencing can be arranged to connect to the court's AVL system to facilitate interstate or overseas witnesses to give evidence remotely.

Parties seeking to use external video conferencing are generally responsible for the payment of any associated fees and charges. Request to use external videoconferencing must be approved by a judicial officer. Apply directly to the court or tribunal hearing the case.


Audio facilities

Where videoconferencing is not available, request can be made for a person to appear via telephone. Attendance by audio facility must be approved by a judicial officer, apply directly to the court or tribunal hearing the case.


Remote witness facilities 

Many courts have remote witness facilities. These allow witnesses to provide evidence to the court via video links from a safe, secure location, which is separate from the courtroom.

A judicial officer must approve evidence via a remote witness room. Apply directly to the court or tribunal hearing the case.


Electronic evidence playback

Most courtrooms are equipped with electronic evidence playback facilities. The equipment includes DVDs, CDs, cassette, VHS, PC input and document imaging. Most courtrooms have VHS replay capability.

There are standard formats for the presentation of electronic evidence in court.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The information on this site is a guide only and is not legal advice - see disclaimer.